Lover of books, rats, and things that are nifty. Atheist, liberal, historian, scientist.

 

prettybooks:

Book Review: The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett @ Pretty Books
Rating: ★★★★
When Mary Lennox is sent to Misselthwaite Manor to live with her uncle everybody says she is the most disagreeable-looking child ever seen. It is true, too. Mary is pale, spoiled, and quite contrary. But she is also horribly lonely. Then one day she hears about a garden in the grounds of the manor that has been kept locked and hidden for years. And when a friendly robin helps Mary find the key, she discovers the most magical place anyone could imagine. Continue to the review.Have you signed up to the 2014 Classics Challenge?

This was one of my favorite books growing up.  I really need to read it again.

prettybooks:

Book Review: The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett @ Pretty Books

Rating: ★★★★

When Mary Lennox is sent to Misselthwaite Manor to live with her uncle everybody says she is the most disagreeable-looking child ever seen. It is true, too. Mary is pale, spoiled, and quite contrary. But she is also horribly lonely. Then one day she hears about a garden in the grounds of the manor that has been kept locked and hidden for years. And when a friendly robin helps Mary find the key, she discovers the most magical place anyone could imagine. Continue to the review.

Have you signed up to the 2014 Classics Challenge?

This was one of my favorite books growing up.  I really need to read it again.

Just finished reading: Hit Me, by Lawrence Block
Finally, a book for the stamp-loving murderer-for-hire in all of us!
But really, Lawrence Block is an excellent thriller writer.  Plus, I really do collect stamps, so this book made my philatelist side tingle moistly.

Just finished reading: Hit Me, by Lawrence Block

Finally, a book for the stamp-loving murderer-for-hire in all of us!

But really, Lawrence Block is an excellent thriller writer.  Plus, I really do collect stamps, so this book made my philatelist side tingle moistly.

phobic-squid asked
Heyyyyyy I've never picked up a Terry Pratchett book and I know you're a fan. Which one would you recommend to introduce me to his work?

The great thing about Pratchett’s Discworld series is that it’s really a bunch of little series tied together along with a few stand-alone books, so there are a lot of places to start.

Guards! Guards! is the start of the City Watch series-within-a-series, which is my favorite of the series-within-a-series.  Dragons, secret societies, virgin sacrifices, conspiracies, and an incompetent Watch headed by an alcoholic Sam Vimes abound.

My favorite of the Discworld novels is a stand-alone: The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents.  It’s about talking rats.

Here’s a nice chart detailing how the books fit together:

image

Just finished: Vulcan’s Soul: Exodus, by Josepha Sherman & Susan Shwartz.
It’s been years since I’ve read a Star Trek book.  O nostalgia… sixth grade… a book report… the end of my social life…  *sigh*
Where was I?  Oh yeah, Exodus.  Not the best writing, but not the worst. The plot took a couple of chapters to take hold, but when it did, it was pretty damn interesting.  The narrative alternates between two timelines.  The first takes place soon after the Dominion War and follows the centenarian crew of the original Enterprise as they investigate an incursion into Romulan space.  The second timeline tells the story of the exodus of the Vulcan people in the time of Surak.
Very good introduction to the trilogy; now I have to read the rest.

Just finished: Vulcan’s Soul: Exodus, by Josepha Sherman & Susan Shwartz.

It’s been years since I’ve read a Star Trek book.  O nostalgia… sixth grade… a book report… the end of my social life…  *sigh*

Where was I?  Oh yeah, Exodus.  Not the best writing, but not the worst. The plot took a couple of chapters to take hold, but when it did, it was pretty damn interesting.  The narrative alternates between two timelines.  The first takes place soon after the Dominion War and follows the centenarian crew of the original Enterprise as they investigate an incursion into Romulan space.  The second timeline tells the story of the exodus of the Vulcan people in the time of Surak.

Very good introduction to the trilogy; now I have to read the rest.

Reading now: One of Our Thursdays Is Missing, by Jasper Fforde
It’s hard to describe a series of books set inside books whose characters are book characters, but I guess that’ll have to do.  If you haven’t read any of Jasper Fforde’s novels, I highly recommend them. 

Reading now: One of Our Thursdays Is Missing, by Jasper Fforde

It’s hard to describe a series of books set inside books whose characters are book characters, but I guess that’ll have to do.  If you haven’t read any of Jasper Fforde’s novels, I highly recommend them. 

Many Waters, by Madeleine L’Engle
I read this book over the weekend.  It’s the fourth book in the Wrinkle in Time series, which is why I read it.  I won’t lie to you - it’s a weird-ass mash up of quantum mechanics, time travel, cross-species mating, unicorn-summoning mini mammoths, and the Bible, and I have no idea if I liked it or not.

Many Waters, by Madeleine L’Engle

I read this book over the weekend.  It’s the fourth book in the Wrinkle in Time series, which is why I read it.  I won’t lie to you - it’s a weird-ass mash up of quantum mechanics, time travel, cross-species mating, unicorn-summoning mini mammoths, and the Bible, and I have no idea if I liked it or not.

Out of the six library books I got, one was good and three were crap (I haven’t started the other two yet).  Out of the three crapfests, two of them were so snore-rific that I couldn’t even slog through an entire chapter.

That’s the last time I go anywhere without a rodentqueen-approved book list.

Just finished reading Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn.  Holy Crow T. Robot, what a book.  I can’t go into much detail without giving anything away, but I do have a few thoughts:
I’m becoming a huge fan of the multiple POV storytelling technique, which adds another dimension (or twenty) that a single viewpoint tends to miss.  I didn’t encounter it much before I read the ASOIF books.  In this book, the viewpoint switches between Nick (the husband) and Amy (his missing wife), but not in the way you’d expect.
This book actually scared me a little, in the sense that you can never really know the people in your life.  There is the distinct possibility that they will be able to surprise you in the most horrifying ways.
The ending wasn’t really a let-down, and it wasn’t exactly unsatisfying, but it was definitely not as gripping as the rest of the book.  I can see why they want to change the ending for the movie.

Just finished reading Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn.  Holy Crow T. Robot, what a book.  I can’t go into much detail without giving anything away, but I do have a few thoughts:

  1. I’m becoming a huge fan of the multiple POV storytelling technique, which adds another dimension (or twenty) that a single viewpoint tends to miss.  I didn’t encounter it much before I read the ASOIF books.  In this book, the viewpoint switches between Nick (the husband) and Amy (his missing wife), but not in the way you’d expect.
  2. This book actually scared me a little, in the sense that you can never really know the people in your life.  There is the distinct possibility that they will be able to surprise you in the most horrifying ways.
  3. The ending wasn’t really a let-down, and it wasn’t exactly unsatisfying, but it was definitely not as gripping as the rest of the book.  I can see why they want to change the ending for the movie.

What Was Your First Read of the New Year?

bbc03isstillhere:

tehjennismightier:

alpha-lima-lima-papa:

bookriot:

How’d you pick it? Any superstitions about the first book of the year setting the tone for the whole year?

FOSSE.

I got it for Christmas and I was dying to read it and I just finished it a few days ago, and it was so worth it.

I read Longbourn, which was a Xmas gift.  I read it in two evenings—just gobbled it up—and enjoyed it a lot. Not a life-changer, but clever and so very enjoyable. Recommended.

My first book of the year was Watson and Holmes: A Study in Black, a graphic novel update of Sherlock Holmes set in Harlem.

image

It was really, really good. I had wanted to get it for a while, but I picked it up with a gift card I got for Christmas and am so glad I finally did! The story was compelling, the characterization was great, the artwork was amazing. I can’t recommend it enough.

My first for 2014 was The Zombie Survival Guide, by Max Brooks.

It had been languishing on my shelf since my birthday.  It wasn’t until I had read the first compendium of The Walking Dead that it seemed right to read it.

This is the book where I got the bunny pattern. Good book, 100s of patterns.

Reading now - 
uh
wait a sec
I think that’s the wrong pic-
…
I’m not reading Hugh Laurie.
I mean, I’d like to do other things to/with/for/on Hugh Laurie, but reading is not one of them.  Or it might be.
…
Let me start over.
Reading now: The Gun Seller, by Hugh Laurie
Ah, there we go.  The man has a way with words.  Funny and clever, wonderful characters.  Why has Hugh Laurie only written one novel?

Reading now -

uh

wait a sec

I think that’s the wrong pic-

I’m not reading Hugh Laurie.

I mean, I’d like to do other things to/with/for/on Hugh Laurie, but reading is not one of them.  Or it might be.

Let me start over.

Reading now: The Gun Seller, by Hugh Laurie

Ah, there we go.  The man has a way with words.  Funny and clever, wonderful characters.  Why has Hugh Laurie only written one novel?

Reading now:  The Supernatural Book of Monsters, Demons, Spirits and Ghouls, by Alex Irvine
Fairly light reading.  The book covers most of the monsters, etc., that the Winchesters encountered in the first seasons of the show, along with relevant stories and legends.  Good for a refresher if it’s been a while since you’ve seen early Supernatural.

Reading now:  The Supernatural Book of Monsters, Demons, Spirits and Ghouls, by Alex Irvine

Fairly light reading.  The book covers most of the monsters, etc., that the Winchesters encountered in the first seasons of the show, along with relevant stories and legends.  Good for a refresher if it’s been a while since you’ve seen early Supernatural.

It’s mah birthday

and i spent way too much at the bookstore for too few books

no regrets

Reading now:  NOS4A2, by Joe Hill
Beautiful, intriguing, addictive, creepy, cringe-worthy.  Not, however, nightmare-inducing.  Because I am an adult, and I do not have nightmares because of books.  Bad dreams, maybe, and I might have lost a teeny tiny fraction of a night’s sleep, but a nightmare?  Never!
…
*turns light off*
*whimpers*
*turns light back on*
*burns every Christmas album in the house*

Reading now:  NOS4A2, by Joe Hill

Beautiful, intriguing, addictive, creepy, cringe-worthy.  Not, however, nightmare-inducing.  Because I am an adult, and I do not have nightmares because of books.  Bad dreams, maybe, and I might have lost a teeny tiny fraction of a night’s sleep, but a nightmare?  Never!

*turns light off*

*whimpers*

*turns light back on*

*burns every Christmas album in the house*